All posts by Heidi Simon

Walking College 2018 Module #3: Building a Movement (DATES)

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies

Jump Directly to:
Study Materials
Community Activities
Discussion Forums
Additional Readings and Resources

Learning Objectives

After completing this Module, Fellows will be able to:

  • Communicate effectively and build trusting relationships
  • Recruit and inspire other local advocates to join the movement
  • Organize public events and programs that encourage people to engage in walking
  • Design and implement communication campaigns that emphasize the need for improved walkability
  • Develop a draft Action Plan for future events, programs, and communications
Study Materials


Starting Movements

Community Engagement

Communication Strategies

Hosting Events and Programs

Check out these America Walks fact sheets on hosting a variety of walking-related activities, including open streets, safe routes, walking meetings and more.

Community Activities

  • Walking Action Plan assignment: Make a list of existing and potential new partners to be involved in your walkability work and reach out to one or two prospective partners to let them know about what you are doing and how your interests might align.
  • Choose from ONE of the two assignments listed below:

1. Write and submit for publication a short (aim for a maximum 600 words or less – check your local newspaper guidelines for specific limitations) Op-Ed or letter to the editor about walkability for your local newspaper. Consider using your Walking College fellowship and/or the specific experience that inspired your interest in advocacy as hooks. You might also center your writing on a particular walking-related program or project that is happening – or needs to happen – in your community. Share the results (published or not) with us for possible inclusion in the America Walks monthly newsletter.

2. If you haven’t done so already, research and compile pedestrian crash statistics for your community. Try to find information on where crashes most-commonly occur and gender and race of those most-commonly affected. If possible, describe what infrastructure is like in some of the crash hot spots. See module 1’s section on measuring walkability for some tips on obtaining crash statistics.

Discussion Forums


Fellows Only Discussion (Week 1)

Review and discussion of “‘Zero Traffic Deaths’ Movement Gaining Speed in Major U.S. Cities”

  • Prompt #1: Does your city have a Vision Zero policy in place? What would be/have been the advantages and challenges associated with adopting one? What have the discussions been around transportation safety in your community?
  • Prompt #2: What has your community’s experience been with regard to traffic fatalities? What would you say your community’s collective attitude is with regard to the risk inherent to moving around? What is the extent of your personal experience with traffic fatalities or serious injuries? How does your personal experience affect your perspective on the safety of the transportation network?
  • Prompt #3: What opportunities exist in your community for building/further developing a walkability movement?

Mentor-led Discussion (Week 2)

  • Prompt #1: Describe existing or potential members of your walkable community partnership. How do your interests align? What are some unlikely/unusual partnerships you might consider? What populations or organizations have been left out of walkability discussions in the past that you might be able to enlist?
  • Prompt #2: What are some of your thoughts on how to engage your community around walkability? Do you have a particular audience in mind for your work?
  • Prompt #3. What are some of your ideas for reaching out to vulnerable/disadvantaged populations?

Fellows Only Discussion (Week 3)

  • Prompt #1: What ideas have you gotten from this module or otherwise about events, programs and/or communication strategies that may bolster your Walking Action Plan and advocacy more generally?
  • Prompt #2: What types of events, programs or communication strategies have you been involved with to-date that you found especially productive/effective? What hasn’t worked well?
  • Prompt #3: What topical subject wasn’t included in this module that you would like to learn more about?
Additional Readings and Resources

These are not required, but are intended to augment your personal library and serve as a source of supplementary information to the required readings. They are broken down by subject matter.

Community Engagement

Hosting Events and Programs

Communication Strategies