Transportation Professionals

Case Studies

Tysons Corner: Malls into Walkable Destinations

Tysons Corner, VA, is a sprawling cluster of shopping malls and office parks at the intersection of four major highways in Northern Virginia’s Fairfax County. The regional economic hub contains more than 100,000 jobs but hosts fewer than 20,000 residents. Every day, thousands of commuters flood highways en route to jobs in Tysons Corner and … Continue reading Tysons Corner: Malls into Walkable Destinations

Washington, DC: Temporary Urbanism Program

The Washington, DC, Office of Planning (OP) launched its Temporary Urbanism initiative in 2010 to help transform vacant spaces into dynamic destinations. The initiative emerged out of a 2009 OP forum that brainstormed ways to “catalyze collaborative action across the creative, green, technology, nonprofit, education, and technology sectors.” The OP’s current Temporary Urbanism program is … Continue reading Washington, DC: Temporary Urbanism Program

San Francisco: Parklet Program

The cities of New York and San Francisco have taken the concept of Park(ing) Day and created official programs to repurpose curbside parking into public space on a longer-term basis. The San Francisco Parklet program seeks applications from business improvement districts, retail stores, and restaurants for the opportunity to design, construct, and maintain the spaces … Continue reading San Francisco: Parklet Program

PA & NJ: Context-Sensitive Design

In 2008, the Pennsylvania and New Jersey departments of transportation, in collaboration with the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, published The Smart Transportation Guidebook. The publication provided the framework for updating all other DOT processes around six tenants: Adapt solutions to the context, tailor the approach, plan projects with community collaboration, accommodate alternative transportation modes, … Continue reading PA & NJ: Context-Sensitive Design

Seattle: Sidewalk Network Analysis

Seattle used a GIS-based approach to prioritize potential sidewalk projects. The city first analyzed sidewalk needs based on the presence and characteristics of existing sidewalks, such as physical buffers, traffic speeds and volumes, and block length. The city then analyzed sidewalks based on three demand analyses—potential pedestrian demand, socioeconomic / health equity, and corridor function—and … Continue reading Seattle: Sidewalk Network Analysis

New York: Planning for Multiple Modes

In 2009, NYC Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) and MTA New York City Transit (NYCT) teamed up to design and implement the M15 Select Bus Service (SBS) line along First and Second Avenues in Manhattan. The SBS project, which was modeled after bus rapid transit to provide subway-like service with buses, aimed to meet goals previously … Continue reading New York: Planning for Multiple Modes

New York: Slow Zones

In November 2011, the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) launched its first Neighborhood Slow Zone pilot program in the Claremont neighborhood of the Bronx. The area was selected for its relatively high frequency of serious traffic crashes and for its definable boundaries that could be easily marked for a zone. The goal of … Continue reading New York: Slow Zones

Toronto: Arterial Street Redesigns

Kingston Road, a six-lane highway in Toronto, Ontario, became the subject of several “revisioning” sessions. The first of these visions emerged from a two-week design charette sponsored by Canadian Architect magazine and the City of Toronto in 2006, which recommended an incremental design strategy. The vision include pocket parks connecting crosswalks and medians, and temporary … Continue reading Toronto: Arterial Street Redesigns

New York: Pedestrian Plazas

The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) removed two of four vehicular lanes along Broadway between Columbus Circle and Union Square in Midtown Manhattan (a distance of 2 miles) and built a buffered bicycle lane and pedestrian plazas using temporary materials like textured paint and roadway markings in the newly freed roadway space. This … Continue reading New York: Pedestrian Plazas

Kansas City: Pedestrian Criteria

When creating its 2003 Walkability Plan, the Kansas City Planning and Development Department modeled its pedestrian-system evaluation criteria on the concept of automobile level of service or LOS. Level of service is a measurement of delay ranging from A to F. Kansas City created pedestrian level-of-service criteria that measured directness, continuity, street crossings, visual interest and … Continue reading Kansas City: Pedestrian Criteria

Tactics

High-Visibility Crosswalks

Crosswalk markings provide guidance for pedestrians crossing roadways by defining the appropriate paths for them. While basic crosswalk markings consist of two transverse lines, an FHWA study found that continental markings were detected at about twice the distance upstream as the transverse markings during daytime conditions. In the study, this increased distance meant that drivers … Continue reading High-Visibility Crosswalks

Offset Crosswalks

An offset crosswalk is one with a center median that acts as both a pedestrian safety island and means of directing pedestrians to look toward oncoming traffic before crossing the second half of the street. Guidance The crosswalk offset can be a right angle or skewed depending on site conditions Design islands with level cut-through … Continue reading Offset Crosswalks

Pedestrian Crossing Islands

Located on the roadway between opposing lanes of traffic, pedestrian crossing islands separate pedestrians from vehicles at intersections or mid-block locations. They are typically raised medians or islands, though lower-cost versions can be made of pavement markings only. Crossing islands can also be referred to as center islands, refuge islands, or pedestrian islands. Guidance Provide … Continue reading Pedestrian Crossing Islands

Raised Crosswalks

A raised crosswalk is a higher section of pavement with a marked crosswalk. It is placed across the street to encourage drivers to slow down. Raised intersections usually have sloped ramps for the driver leading and following the flat raised-crosswalk section. Guidance Construct a 10–15’ plateau 2–3” shorter than sidewalk level with straight 6’ ramps … Continue reading Raised Crosswalks

Daylighting

To “daylight” an intersection is to clear sight lines between pedestrian crossings and oncoming cars, usually by creating no-parking zones at the curbs in front of crosswalks at that intersection. Guidance Install no-parking signs to mark the existence and length of no-parking zones Daylight at least 20′ (about one parking space) from the crosswalk at … Continue reading Daylighting

Analyze Person Delay Instead of Vehicle Delay

In Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) traffic analysis, “person delay” is defined as the total time required to move individuals, as opposed to their vehicles, through a particular lane of an intersection. This approach to analyzing traffic through intersections is more transit- (and pedestrian-) friendly than measuring vehicle delay. Guidance Calculate person delay by multiplying the … Continue reading Analyze Person Delay Instead of Vehicle Delay

Integrate Pedestrian LOS Criteria into Traffic Analyses

Traditional traffic analysis evaluates the adequacy of a road design to meet vehicular travel demand using a quantitative measurement of delay called level of service (LOS). For many years, traffic-analysis procedures didn’t adequately address pedestrian travel demand in these road-design evaluations. The current Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) addresses this analysis gap with new multimodal LOS … Continue reading Integrate Pedestrian LOS Criteria into Traffic Analyses

Redesign Arterial Streets for Pedestrians

Arterial streets, typically multilane thoroughfares designed to speed cars from one destination to another, are often hazardous to people on foot. The Tri-State Transportation Campaign found that 60% of pedestrian deaths in the tri-state region of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut took place on arterial roadways. Redesigning arterial streets for pedestrians involves adapting roadway … Continue reading Redesign Arterial Streets for Pedestrians

Build Pedestrian and Cyclist Bridges

These are bridges designed exclusively for pedestrians and bicyclists where at-grade solutions can’t be found—often over railways, waterways, or highways— that provide needed transportation links for walkers and cyclists. Guidance Exhaust at-grade solutions first, as those are often more walkable and less expensive Locate bridges so that they are on the normal path of pedestrian … Continue reading Build Pedestrian and Cyclist Bridges

Turn Underutilized Asphalt into Grass and Other Uses

Underutilized, excessive roadway and/or parking space can be reassigned to pedestrian and/or bicycle uses. Underutilized or excessive roadways have more travel lanes (or parking spaces) than necessary for the number of cars using them. New uses of roadway or parking space could include public plazas with planters and seating areas, buffered bicycle lanes, and widened … Continue reading Turn Underutilized Asphalt into Grass and Other Uses

Webinars

Partnering for Strong Economies- Regional Councils & Walkable Communities Webinar

America Walks and the National Association of Regional Councils hosted webinar which examines how federal transportation funding is allocated through Regional Councils and how to access it for projects that promote walkable communities including complete streets, safety efforts and place-making. The webinar explores two unique perspectives as we hear from both a planner from a … Continue reading Partnering for Strong Economies- Regional Councils & Walkable Communities Webinar

New Webinar- Partnering for Strong Economies: Regional Councils and Walkable Communities

Webinar Title:  Partnering for Strong Economies: Regional Councils and Walkable Communities Date and Time: May 5, 2016 at 2pm Eastern, 11am Pacific Register Here  About the Webinar Join America Walks and the National Association of Regional Councils for a webinar on May 5th at 2pm Eastern, 11am Pacific. The webinar will examine how federal transportation … Continue reading New Webinar- Partnering for Strong Economies: Regional Councils and Walkable Communities

New Webinar- Pedestrian Planning for Communities: A Transferable Training and Implementation Program from Kentucky

Date and Time: Thursday, February 11th at 11am Pacific, 2pm Eastern Register Here About the Webinar America Walks’ Tools for the Field webinar series continues February 11th by showcasing Kentucky’s “Pedestrian Planning for Communities” training and implementation program. In the last few years, this partnership effort, led by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and the Department … Continue reading New Webinar- Pedestrian Planning for Communities: A Transferable Training and Implementation Program from Kentucky

New Webinar- Institutionalizing the Change

Webinar Title: “Institutionalizing the Change: How to Make Walking Routine” Date and Time: Wednesday, July 15th at 11am Pacific, 2pm Eastern Register Here About the Webinar The third webinar in America Walks’ “Walking College” series reviews public policy and private marketplace strategies to increase walkability. Just like the others in the series, this webinar is … Continue reading New Webinar- Institutionalizing the Change

New Webinar- Designing Places for People

Webinar Title: “Designing Places for People” Date and Time: Tuesday June 23rd, 2015 at 2pm Eastern, 11am Pacific Register Here About the Webinar America Walks’ summer series of webinars has been designed for the 25 appointed Fellows of the “Walking College,” but is open to the public.   The second webinar in the series, “Designing Places for … Continue reading New Webinar- Designing Places for People

Mayors’ Challenge for Safer People, Safer Streets Webinar

On May 22, 2015 America Walks held the webinar, “Mayors’ Challenge for Safer People, Safer Streets.”  This webinar is part of the “Take Action at the Local Level” webinar series that calls upon individuals to build community and institutional support for walkable design. Barbara McCann, former Executive Director of the National Complete Streets Coalition, and now … Continue reading Mayors’ Challenge for Safer People, Safer Streets Webinar

Complete Streets From Policy Adoption to Implementation in New Jersey

This webinar covered complete streets, in general and in New Jersey, discussing every topic from complete streets policy adoption to implementation. In addition to highlighting successful municipal and county case studies focused on complete streets implementation, this webinar highlighted strategies on getting complete streets polices passed at the municipal level and creating elderly-friendly communities. 2014-06-12 … Continue reading Complete Streets From Policy Adoption to Implementation in New Jersey

Keeping Pedestrians Safe in Urban and Suburban Settings

Walking is the mode of choice for some, and the only choice for many. It is imperative that pedestrian safety becomes a priority for and incorporated into all planning and design processes. This webinar, Walking Shouldn’t Be Hazardous to Your Health: Keeping Pedestrians Safe in Urban and Suburban Settings, provides an overview of tools, campaigns … Continue reading Keeping Pedestrians Safe in Urban and Suburban Settings

Illuminating the Path: The Critical Role Federal Agencies Play in Creating Safe, Walkable Communities

Federal agencies play an increasingly important role in supporting, facilitating and implementing programs that directly or indirectly help create safe, walkable environments. Join us for this webinar to learn about this exciting work! This webinar will highlight projects and programs supported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), The National Endowment of the Arts (NEA), the … Continue reading Illuminating the Path: The Critical Role Federal Agencies Play in Creating Safe, Walkable Communities

Health & the Environment – An Interdisciplinary Approach to Healthy Aging

Health, the environment and other factors such as lifestyle have a great impact on overall quality of life.  Research shows that being healthy over our lifespan and healthy aging have a direct correlation.  We know physical activity/walking is one of the key ingredients in achieving this goal.  This webinar will feature the health benefits of … Continue reading Health & the Environment – An Interdisciplinary Approach to Healthy Aging